Calendar of Events

07/29/2020
Living Room Lectures | Eric Brooks: Traces: Slavery at Ashland
Wednesday, 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Eric Brooks | Traces: Slavery at Ashland

Locust Grove is going live from our living rooms for a virtual lecture series! Slavery has been one of the most difficult topics for historic sites to address. That has certainly been the case at Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate over its 70 years of operation as a museum. This program, presented by Eric Brooks, Curator of Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate, will explore the evolution of the interpretation of slavery at Ashland over the years and highlight information from its new tour Traces: Slavery at Ashland which debuted earlier this year.
This program sponsored in part by John and Jeannie Vezeau.
This lecture will take place online using Zoom. Register here: https://bit.ly/BrooksLecture or by emailing Hannah Zimmerman at marketing@locustgrove.org and receive instructions on how to connect. The lecture is free; a suggested donation of $6 may be made to Locust Grove here: https://bit.ly/livingroomlecture.
Support Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate, here: https://henryclay.org/donate/

09/05/2020
Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission is $9 for adults | $8 for seniors | $4 for children 6-12 years. Admission includes the Visitors' Center, a historic house tour, and the other outbuildings on-site, in addition to the Farm Distillery. 

10/24/2020
Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission: $8 for adults, $4 for children 6- 12, free for children under 6; historic house tours included. Admission includes the 18th Century Market Fair.  

11/04/2020
Afternoon Lecture Series
Wednesday, 1:15pm - 3:00pm

The Locust Grove Afternoon Lecture Series is held the first Wednesday of each month. Dessert and coffee are served at 1:00 PM with the lecture immediately following at 1:15 pm. Admission is $6, $4 for Friends of Historic Locust Grove. Reservations are not required.

11/14/2020
Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission is $9 for adults | $8 for seniors | $4 for children 6-12 years. Admission includes the Visitors' Center, a historic house tour, and the other outbuildings on-site, in addition to the Farm Distillery. 

Please click the calendar on the left for individual event information.
Living Room Lectures | Eric Brooks: Traces: Slavery at Ashland
Wednesday, 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Eric Brooks | Traces: Slavery at Ashland

Locust Grove is going live from our living rooms for a virtual lecture series! Slavery has been one of the most difficult topics for historic sites to address. That has certainly been the case at Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate over its 70 years of operation as a museum. This program, presented by Eric Brooks, Curator of Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate, will explore the evolution of the interpretation of slavery at Ashland over the years and highlight information from its new tour Traces: Slavery at Ashland which debuted earlier this year.
This program sponsored in part by John and Jeannie Vezeau.
This lecture will take place online using Zoom. Register here: https://bit.ly/BrooksLecture or by emailing Hannah Zimmerman at marketing@locustgrove.org and receive instructions on how to connect. The lecture is free; a suggested donation of $6 may be made to Locust Grove here: https://bit.ly/livingroomlecture.
Support Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate, here: https://henryclay.org/donate/

Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission is $9 for adults | $8 for seniors | $4 for children 6-12 years. Admission includes the Visitors' Center, a historic house tour, and the other outbuildings on-site, in addition to the Farm Distillery. 

Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission: $8 for adults, $4 for children 6- 12, free for children under 6; historic house tours included. Admission includes the 18th Century Market Fair.  

Afternoon Lecture Series
Wednesday, 1:15pm - 3:00pm

The Locust Grove Afternoon Lecture Series is held the first Wednesday of each month. Dessert and coffee are served at 1:00 PM with the lecture immediately following at 1:15 pm. Admission is $6, $4 for Friends of Historic Locust Grove. Reservations are not required.

Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission is $9 for adults | $8 for seniors | $4 for children 6-12 years. Admission includes the Visitors' Center, a historic house tour, and the other outbuildings on-site, in addition to the Farm Distillery.