Museum Hours

Find our Visitors' Guide here

Tuesday - Saturday 10:00am to 4:30pm

Tours offered Thursday - Saturday 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm on the quarter-hour.
Locust Grove is closed for tours the month of January, Sundays and Mondays, and on Easter, Derby Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year's Eve.
A visit usually begins with the (optional) viewing of a 12 minute introductory film. The self-guided tour of the house and grounds is available Thursdays through Saturdays from 12:00 - 3:00 pm and is scheduled on the quarter-hour. A self-guided tour should be scheduled in advance online here.
Photography policy may be found here.

Admission

$12 for adults
$10 for seniors
$6 for children 6-18 years
Discounts for AAA members, please inquire. Group rates are offered for groups of 10 or more and must be scheduled in advance.

Directions

561 Blankenbaker Lane, Louisville, KY 40207
 
From I-65
Take I-71 North. Continue on I-71, passing the I-64 split, and exit at Zorn Avenue. Turn left onto Zorn, taking care as you cross the median. Make a right turn onto River road at the light (Chevron Station on the corner). Turn right onto Blankenbaker Lane, approximately 6 miles from downtown Louisville, at the traffic light. You will proceed gradually uphill as you travel away from the river, and will find the entrance to the Locust Grove parking lot on your left, immediately past Twin Hill (on the right).  
From Downtown Louisville
Take either the I-71 to Zorn Avenue route described above, or if you are already close to the riverfront, just take River Road all the way out to Blankenbaker Lane.  
From points along the Watterson Expressway (I-264)
Take the Watterson eastward to the Brownsboro Road (U. S. 42) exit. At the end of the ramp, turn left and proceed to the third traffic light. Turn right onto Blankenbaker Lane. Locust Grove will come into view within about 1-1/2 miles, just as you crest a small ridge. Make a right turn into the parking lot, just after passing the historic house.

2020 Calendar of Events

07/29/2020
Living Room Lectures | Eric Brooks: Traces: Slavery at Ashland
Wednesday, 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Eric Brooks | Traces: Slavery at Ashland

Locust Grove is going live from our living rooms for a virtual lecture series! Slavery has been one of the most difficult topics for historic sites to address. That has certainly been the case at Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate over its 70 years of operation as a museum. This program, presented by Eric Brooks, Curator of Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate, will explore the evolution of the interpretation of slavery at Ashland over the years and highlight information from its new tour Traces: Slavery at Ashland which debuted earlier this year.
This program sponsored in part by John and Jeannie Vezeau.
This lecture will take place online using Zoom. Register here: https://bit.ly/BrooksLecture or by emailing Hannah Zimmerman at marketing@locustgrove.org and receive instructions on how to connect. The lecture is free; a suggested donation of $6 may be made to Locust Grove here: https://bit.ly/livingroomlecture.
Support Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate, here: https://henryclay.org/donate/

09/05/2020
Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission is $9 for adults | $8 for seniors | $4 for children 6-12 years. Admission includes the Visitors' Center, a historic house tour, and the other outbuildings on-site, in addition to the Farm Distillery. 

10/24/2020
Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission: $8 for adults, $4 for children 6- 12, free for children under 6; historic house tours included. Admission includes the 18th Century Market Fair.  

11/04/2020
Afternoon Lecture Series
Wednesday, 1:15pm - 3:00pm

The Locust Grove Afternoon Lecture Series is held the first Wednesday of each month. Dessert and coffee are served at 1:00 PM with the lecture immediately following at 1:15 pm. Admission is $6, $4 for Friends of Historic Locust Grove. Reservations are not required.

11/14/2020
Farm Distillery Day at Locust Grove
Saturday, 10:00am - 4:30pm

Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a 19th century farm distillery as we prepare a period mash! The Locust Grove Farm Distillery project represents the small farm-scale distilling activities of early Kentucky, before mass production. Learn how whiskey and brandy would be made—from grain to still—and how distilling was one of the best ways to preserve excess grain and fruit crops. As distilling was often the work of enslaved workers, especially women, you'll hear about their impact on the small farm economy of the early 19th century. In 1808, the year William Croghan of Locust Grove acquired his still, Kentucky’s whiskey had not yet developed into the now distinct Bourbon. While some of the elements were there, Locust Grove’s whiskey was likely white and unaged, never having touched the inside of a barrel.
In partnership with Kentucky Artisan Distillery and Spirits of French Lick.
This facility does not produce alcohol or spirits.
Admission is $9 for adults | $8 for seniors | $4 for children 6-12 years. Admission includes the Visitors' Center, a historic house tour, and the other outbuildings on-site, in addition to the Farm Distillery. 

Please click the calendar on the left for individual event information.